10 Popular Google Web Fonts

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There's no shortage of "trends' that Web designers must pay attention to, but few are more practical - and impactful - than the use of Web fonts. 

Many, many Internet years ago, Web designers' choice of fonts were limited to the typefaces that were found on users’ machines. The result was a lack of typographical creativity. With CSS3 however, some browsers started supporting @font-face, which enabled designers to display custom fonts on their webpages. As a result, many Web font services emerged including TypeKit, and eventually, Google Web Fonts.

There are now well over 600 fonts supported in Google Web Fonts, and in today’s Web Design & Development Digest we are featuring 10 of the most popular fonts that can be found through that resource. Not only are they some of the most popular, but in our opinion, they are also some of the most usable. You’ll also find listed below a chart indicating how many times the font was served by the Google Font API over the past few weeks/months.

If you’re using Google Web fonts, let us know which is your favorite. Website Magazine will provide a follow up to this post with a reference to that font and, if it is in use on your Web property, a link to that as well. Enjoy these fonts!


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OPEN SANS

Open Sans Web Font
Open Sans Web Font Usage Stats

 

OSWALD

Olwald Web Font
Olwald Web Font Usage Stats

 

PT SANS

PT Sans Web Font
PT Sans Web Font Usage Stats

 

YANONE KAFFEESATZ

Yanone Kaffeesatz Web Font
Yanone Kaffeesatz Font Usage Stats

 

ARVO

Arvo Web Font
Arvo Web Font Usage Stats

 

LORA

Lora Web FOnt
Lora Web Font Usage Stats

 

RALEWAY

Raleway Web Font
Raleway Web Font Usage Stats

 

BITTER

Bitter Web Font
Bitter Web Font Usage Stats

CABIN

Cabin Web Font
Cabin Web Font Usage Stats

CUPRUM

Cuprum Web Font
Cuprum Web Font Usage Stats

 

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8 comments

WesM 09-12-2013 3:00 PM

Helpful article but...next time make sure you take your screen shots in a browser where the anti-alias is working for you.  Kind of hard to appreciate each font when the presentations of each one are so choppy and not-so-smooth.

Also, there's an additional Google Font that has picked up steam lately that is great for text copy:  LATO

Peter Curtis 09-12-2013 4:05 PM

I find Lato quite a useful typeface, especially for headings. What I particularly like about Lato is that it comes in five weights, including roman and italic characters--a total of 10 character sets.

SteveM 09-12-2013 4:36 PM

It is ironic that an article touting the beauty and usability of ten typefaces shows those fonts in bitmapped, jagged fashion. One would expect more from a site called websitemagazine.com, that they could at least take a decent screenshot. The world of better typography on the web lurches forward in fits and starts.

CherylH 09-12-2013 5:12 PM

Yes, I'd expect a better type presentation from professionals.

DanR 09-13-2013 5:36 PM

I use the combination of Cuprum and Junge on danromanchik.com.

RomanR 09-14-2013 7:34 PM

Umm, yeah; these font samples are of hideous quality. This is supposed to encourage us to use web fonts?

EmilieV 09-15-2013 9:31 PM

Anti-aliasing is great, but many Web users may see Web fonts in a browser that is set for aliased rendering. Also, anti-aliased rendering can cause some visual fatigue and readability issues that must be considered when choosing a Web font, e.g. for paragraphs. For these reasons, it's important to know how Web fonts are rendered when aliased, and the author of this article made the good choice to show the selected fonts without anti-aliasing.

Jean-francoisC 10-16-2013 3:21 PM

I totally agree with you EmilieV, and also I appreciate that the author made a realistic representation of how MOST OF THE PEOPLE actually see webfonts!

But still, having no anti-aliasing makes everything a bit ugly... I think Chrome on PC is the biggest problem right now. Theres some fixes for it (stackoverflow.com/.../chrome-not-antialiasing-text) but nothing really works...

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